Dr. Aaron Bernard, assistant dean for simulation at the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac. Maya Doyle, assistant professor of social work at Quinnipiac. Kimberly Hartmann, professor of occupational therapy and director of the Center for Interprofessional Education at Quinnipiac.

A panel of Quinnipiac University experts will present the interprofessional case study, “Fatigue: Challenges for a Patient and Providers,” from 3-4:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 17, in the Center for Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Room 225, at Quinnipiac, 370 Bassett Road. This program is made possible by a gift from the Carol L. Sirot Foundation.

The panel will feature Dr. Aaron Bernard, assistant dean for simulation at the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine, Maya Doyle, assistant professor of social work, and Kimberly Hartmann, professor of occupational therapy and director of the Center for Interprofessional Education. They will discuss a case that focuses on the symptoms of fatigue, cases of chronic fatigue syndrome, the impact of chronic fatigue syndrome on all aspects of daily life and how an interprofessional team approach may improve patient outcomes and quality of life.

Myalgic encephalomyelitis, commonly known as chronic fatigue syndrome, affects between 836,000 and 2.5 million Americans. This disease is characterized by profound fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, sleep abnormalities, autonomic manifestations, pain and other symptoms that are made worse by exertion of any sort. While it can severely impair a person’s ability to conduct their normal lives, many people struggle with symptoms for years before receiving a diagnosis.

“Fatigue, and particularly chronic fatigue syndrome, is a challenging entity to diagnose and treat yet the symptoms may lead to significant limitations in daily life, relationships and meaningful activities,” Hartmann said. “In preparing teams for practice, it is essential that they learn to work with each other to pinpoint the issues and provide evidence-based interventions to promote health and wellbeing.”

While this program is free and open to the public, registration is required by calling 203-582-8652.

Posted by Chris

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