Quinnipiac University School of Law to host “Topics in American Legal History” symposium March 25

This virtual symposium, which will feature presentations by five distinguished scholars, is free and open to the public.

 

The Quinnipiac University School of Law’s 2022 Carmen Tortora Online Symposium, “Topics in American Legal History,” will take place from 12-5 p.m. on Friday, March 25. This virtual symposium, which will feature presentations by five distinguished scholars, is free and open to the public. However, registration is required.

Kate Masur, professor of history and board of visitors professor at Northwestern University, will present “Until Justice Be Done: The Struggle to Repeal the Midwestern ‘Black Laws’” from noon-1 p.m. She will discuss the “black laws” of the Midwestern states and the antebellum struggle to repeal them.

George Thomas, board of governors’ professor of law and Judge Waugh distinguished scholar at Rutgers Law School, will present “Peering Through the Mists of Time: Colonial Criminal Law and Procedure” from 1-2 p.m. He will talk about colonial criminal law and procedure.

Elizabeth D. Katz, associate professor at Washington University School of Law, will present “‘The Heart and Soul of a Successful Family Court’: The Symbiotic Development of Probation and Specialized Domestic Relations Courts” from 2-3 p.m. Katz will trace the development of courts of domestic relations starting in the early 20th century.

Philip Hamburger, the Maurice & Hilda Friedman professor of law at Columbia Law School, will present “Judicial Review or Judicial Duty” from 3-4 p.m. He will discuss and question the concept of “judicial review.”

David Konig, professor emeritus of history at Washington University in St. Louis, will deliver the keynote address from 4-5 p.m. His talk, “Teaching and Learning Law in the Early American Republic: What Professors Taught and What Students Learned,” will explore the struggle to define the meaning and purpose of a “law school” in a university setting, and to distinguish it from that of a “lawyer school” in a law office. This conflict arose in the revolutionary era and continues to challenge law schools today.

For more information about the symposium, please contact Stanton Krauss, professor of law, at [email protected].

Posted by Chris

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